southernexposuresphoto

southernexposuresphoto:

ramblinglokean:

crystiannia:

Ran’s Runes (divination tool in honor of the sea goddess)

From a dream I had. A plain mason jar with sand, shells, rocks and sea glass from our local shores. Added in small blue garden stones with runes painted on them.

Simply turn and watch the changing sandscape until a rune - or several - are clearly visible to guide you. :)

Oh, wow. I like this.

I thought
spiritualbrainstorms
might like this.
whoreofabaddon

eraonadventures asked:

I'm pretty late from the 'free religious stuff' discussion, but for those interseted, the Yale has 2 religius studies online courses on their webpage. No fees, no registration and you can watch the course, download the transcript, the handouts and get a massive reading list. I've started the Introduction to the Old Testament and I'm enjoying it thoroughly. Just thought I'd share.

whoreofabaddon answered:

This is wonderful.

Followers, please take note.

opalborn

lebornaciar:

ciar lionheart’s one thousand follower giveaway

the books i ordered are in and so i can finally put this up! to celebrate reaching quadruple digits last month, and to spread some love for all the honour you do me by being here to enjoy my blog, i am hosting a small giveaway.

what you will get:

  • one copy of james mackillop’s myths and legends of the celts, which everyone interested in celtic mythology should read.
  • one copy of eloise mcgraw’s the moorchild, which was an extremely formative novel for me and draws very heavily on folk traditions surrounding the faeries of the scottish highlands.
  • one copy of holly black’s the poison eaters, which contains a collection of gorgeously written short stories, many about faeries, the majority with a delightfully ominous fairy tale atmosphere.
  • one hemp keychain or bracelet, custom made by me and charmed for whatever you desire. please note that the items in the photo are samples only—i will be making a single, individualized piece for the winner.

rules:

  • you do not have to be following me.
  • likes and reblogs both count.
  • you can reblog as many times as you want, but only one reblog shows up in the notes at a time so it won’t get you any extra entries.
  • you must have your ask box open so i can contact you in the event that you win. the winner will have forty-eight hours to respond before i select a new winner.
  • you must be willing to give me your address to ship to.
  • in the event that you win, you are allowed to gift your prize to a friend. this can be done openly, in which case i will contact them to work out the details of their charm, or as a surprise.
  • i will ship internationally! i live in canada, so any shipping to canada or the united states will come at no charge. if you live elsewhere in the world, we can work out the details depending on cost.
  • the winner will be selected by random number generator at 11:59 p.m. eastern standard time on october first.
  • october first is also my birthday. buying me presents will not win you any extra entries but it will make me flail excitedly in your general direction.

good luck, and once again, thank you all so much for being here.

talysia

vincisomething:

doctorsdemons:

whitedarryl:

asatira:

elfgrove:

mmemento:

leaper182:

bead-bead:

the-writers-ramblings:

i cant even make it past the table of contents im laughing too hard

WHAT IS THIS BOOK!?!

It’s called “Zeus Grants Stupid Wishes: A No-Bullshit Guide to World Mythology”
By Cory O’Brien, and it looks highly entertaining. :D

Gilgamesh: THE ULTIMATE BROMANCE

Give it here, now.

Sweet Fluffy Gods why is there not an audiobook version?

I need to find this book.

The first time Iv’e wanted to read something since Metro 2033.

guy

guys…look what we did :D

I want this book

southerngamerguy
mulatoomcmxci:

steppauseturnpausepivotstepstep:

babybutta:

yarrahs-life:

high-power-prolific:

thehereticpharaoh:

People really don’t believe Ancient Egyptians were ethnically African?

They referred to themselves, not as ”Egyptians” (a Greek term) , but as ”Kemmui’’, meaning, ”the blacks”.
The country itself they called, Kemet, or black nation.
'Kem' is the term for black in the ancient Egyptian language. It is represented in hieroglyphs by a stick charred at both ends.”
"km.t, the name of Ancient Egypt in Egyptian; Egypt (Coptic: Kemi)
r n km.t, the native term for the Egyptian language
(Ref: The Egyptian Hieroglyphic Dictionary, Vols 1&2, E.A. Budge, Dover.) 
Note: words inside brackets are the determinatives or word classifiers along with their English meanings.
Kem, kame, kmi, kmem, kmom = to be black 
Kememu = Black people (Ancient Egyptians) in both Ancient and modern Egyptian (Kmemou).
Kem [khet][wood] = extremely black, jet-black
Kemet = any black thing. Note: “t” is silent - pronounced Kemé
Kemet [nu][community, settlement, nation] = Black nation = Ancient Egypt.  
Kemet [Romé][people] = Black people. Ancient Egyptians. 
Kemit [Shoit][books] = Black books, Ancient Egyptian literature.  
Kem wer [miri][large body of water] = The Great Black sea (The Red sea). This sea is neither black nor red, this is in reference to which nation, Black or Red, at a particular time, controlled this body of water. 
Kemi fer = Black double house; seat of government. Note: by reference to Wolof again, we know that to make a plural of per or house, the “p” becomes an “f” or fer. Thus fero=great houses (double), it is not pero as Budge writes.
In Ancient Egyptian, the ordinary adjective always follows the noun it modifies, whereas a sanctified adjective usually comes before its noun.  The sanctified adjectives are:
Kem —  Black
Suten -  Royal
Nter —-  Holy, Sacred
Examples:
Kem ti = Black image, sacred image : ti oubash = white image  
Kem ho = Black face/title of a god   : ho oubash = white face  
Kem ta = Black land, holy land        : Ta deshret = Red land (also; Ta Sett) 
This rule does not apply when Black is used as a noun-adjective of nationality:  
Hompt Kemet = copper of Black; Egyptian copper :  Hompt Sett = copper of the Red nations; Asiatic copper  
Ro in Kemet (page 416a) = speech of Black; mute ro n Kemet = word of the mouth of Black; the Egyptian language
Kemet Deshret = Black and Red; good and evil; fertile and barren, etc.; Duality  
Deshretu (page 554a,b) = red ones, red devils.  Used also to refer to the Namu and Tamhu; not a complimentary label. 
African Origins: 
The following Ancient Egyptian words acknowledge the origins of Pharaonic Egyptian civilization; 
Khentu Hon Nefer (page 554a) = founders of the Excellent Order. Budge: “peoples and tribes of Nubia and the Egyptian Sudan.” For “Hon” see page 586b. 
Hon Nefer (page 1024b) = Excellent Order
Kenus (page1024b) = mighty; brave (from Kenu, page 772a)
Ta Khent (page 1051b/page 554b) = land of the beginning.  
Eau (page 952b/page 17b) = the old country  
Ancient Egyptian’s Worldview:  
The Egyptian’s view of the world was the exact opposite of the current Western one. To the Egyptian, the top of the world was in the south (upper) towards the African interior, the bottom (lower) towards the north, hence upper and lower Egypt; upper and lower Syria.”
"Oh yes, the black soil business.
Most scholars outside the modern western cover-up establishment have rejected the false interpretation some have given to Kemet, ostensibly alluding the term Kemet to the alleged ”black soil”  of Egypt. There’s nothing in the term, outside the imagination of western myth-makers,  to suggest the Egyptians referred to the color of the soil or sand, rather than the people, in naming their country. Our position is consistent with the testimony of the ancient Greek writers, eyewitnesses who unanimously described the Egyptians as a black people, closely related to the ”Ethiopians”.”

And white Hollywood casts white actors and gives them tans.

*internal sobbing*

i will never not reblog this. i know too many people who for real dont think Egypt is a part of Africa.

KNOW YOUR HISTORY

mulatoomcmxci:

steppauseturnpausepivotstepstep:

babybutta:

yarrahs-life:

high-power-prolific:

thehereticpharaoh:

People really don’t believe Ancient Egyptians were ethnically African?

They referred to themselves, not as ”Egyptians” (a Greek term) , but as ”Kemmui’’, meaning, ”the blacks”.

The country itself they called, Kemet, or black nation.

'Kem' is the term for black in the ancient Egyptian language. It is represented in hieroglyphs by a stick charred at both ends.”

"km.t, the name of Ancient Egypt in Egyptian; Egypt (Coptic: Kemi)

r n km.t, the native term for the Egyptian language

(Ref: The Egyptian Hieroglyphic Dictionary, Vols 1&2, E.A. Budge, Dover.) 

Note: words inside brackets are the determinatives or word classifiers along with their English meanings.

Kem, kame, kmi, kmem, kmom = to be black 

Kememu = Black people (Ancient Egyptians) in both Ancient and modern Egyptian (Kmemou).

Kem [khet][wood] = extremely black, jet-black

Kemet = any black thing. Note: “t” is silent - pronounced Kemé

Kemet [nu][community, settlement, nation] = Black nation = Ancient Egypt.  

Kemet [Romé][people] = Black people. Ancient Egyptians. 

Kemit [Shoit][books] = Black books, Ancient Egyptian literature.  

Kem wer [miri][large body of water] = The Great Black sea (The Red sea). This sea is neither black nor red, this is in reference to which nation, Black or Red, at a particular time, controlled this body of water. 

Kemi fer = Black double house; seat of government. Note: by reference to Wolof again, we know that to make a plural of per or house, the “p” becomes an “f” or fer. Thus fero=great houses (double), it is not pero as Budge writes.

In Ancient Egyptian, the ordinary adjective always follows the noun it modifies, whereas a sanctified adjective usually comes before its noun.  The sanctified adjectives are:

Kem —  Black

Suten -  Royal

Nter —-  Holy, Sacred

Examples:

Kem ti = Black image, sacred image : ti oubash = white image  

Kem ho = Black face/title of a god   : ho oubash = white face  

Kem ta = Black land, holy land        : Ta deshret = Red land (also; Ta Sett) 

This rule does not apply when Black is used as a noun-adjective of nationality:  

Hompt Kemet = copper of Black; Egyptian copper :  Hompt Sett = copper of the Red nations; Asiatic copper  

Ro in Kemet (page 416a) = speech of Black; mute ro n Kemet = word of the mouth of Black; the Egyptian language

Kemet Deshret = Black and Red; good and evil; fertile and barren, etc.; Duality  

Deshretu (page 554a,b) = red ones, red devils.  Used also to refer to the Namu and Tamhu; not a complimentary label. 

African Origins: 

The following Ancient Egyptian words acknowledge the origins of Pharaonic Egyptian civilization; 

Khentu Hon Nefer (page 554a) = founders of the Excellent Order. Budge: “peoples and tribes of Nubia and the Egyptian Sudan.” For “Hon” see page 586b. 

Hon Nefer (page 1024b) = Excellent Order

Kenus (page1024b) = mighty; brave (from Kenu, page 772a)

Ta Khent (page 1051b/page 554b) = land of the beginning.  

Eau (page 952b/page 17b) = the old country  

Ancient Egyptian’s Worldview:  

The Egyptian’s view of the world was the exact opposite of the current Western one. To the Egyptian, the top of the world was in the south (upper) towards the African interior, the bottom (lower) towards the north, hence upper and lower Egypt; upper and lower Syria.”

"Oh yes, the black soil business.

Most scholars outside the modern western cover-up establishment have rejected the false interpretation some have given to Kemet, ostensibly alluding the term Kemet to the alleged ”black soil”  of Egypt. There’s nothing in the term, outside the imagination of western myth-makers,  to suggest the Egyptians referred to the color of the soil or sand, rather than the people, in naming their country. Our position is consistent with the testimony of the ancient Greek writers, eyewitnesses who unanimously described the Egyptians as a black people, closely related to the ”Ethiopians”.”

And white Hollywood casts white actors and gives them tans.

*internal sobbing*

i will never not reblog this. i know too many people who for real dont think Egypt is a part of Africa.

KNOW YOUR HISTORY

To the people that tagged me in the “10 books that stuck with me” thing a while back…

I am SOO sorry! I never got to it for several reasons and I thought I’d saved it in my drafts, but I can’t find it now. :( But I generally love stuff like that, so I don’t want anyone to think I ignored them.  But I figured I’d go ahead an answer.  These are in no particular order. 

1) Interview with the Vampire ~ Anne Rice

This book truly ignited my love of vampires and all things vampire related.  The whole series is amazing and is one of my all time favorites. 

2) The Perks of Being a Wallflower ~ Stephen Chbosky

Let’s face it: most LGBTQ read this book and it just sticks with a lot of us.  

3) The Giver ~ Lois Lowry

This was the first true dystopian book I ever read and it really opened my eyes in a lot of ways to the way we ignore the parts of society that we don’t want to acknowledge, the way certain people are almost assigned certain social roles for arbitrary reasons, regardless of their own desires, etc.  But my love for this book, like that of Anne Rice, led me to read so many more things that would forever have an impact on me. 

4) The Hunger Games ~ Suzanne Collins

Bear with me here.  I know, it’s a a new series and it’s YA, yada yada yada.  But hear me out.  The way The Capitol is portrayed is 100% a critique of American society.  This could probably be extrapolated to Western civilization as a whole, but I think it’s more specifically American.  We don’t and have never had a monarchy, not one of our own, anyway.  But we’re constantly in a race to put celebrities on a pedestal and, for all practical purposes, worship everything they do.  We’re a consumer culture like no other.  We’re constantly trying to outdo everyone else and are often ostentatious simply to be ostentatious.  We, as a whole, are wealthy beyond measure and yet we seem to not appreciate it.  Obviously, this isn’t true for everyone (I live paycheck to paycheck myself), but again, as a whole.  Or as Raymond Williams would say in his “The Analysis of Culture,” our “ideal” culture.

5)  To Kill A Mockingbird ~ Harper Lee

If you haven’t gathered form this or my main blog, I’m very proud and passionate about being Southern and this is a quintessential Southern book by a Southern author se in the South.  It deals with so many issues like racism, scapegoating, ableism, and is a fairly accurate depiction of life in the the South in a small town.  Not to mention her dad’s name is Atticus. How can you not love that? 

6) Harry Potter ~ J.K. Rowling

It’s just a classic at this point and should be accepted as such.  Really, though, it’s just an awesome series with characters I love and grew up with.  Not to mention, I had to sneak to read them because they were considered Satanic in my house growing up, so those are good memories, too. 

7) Fahrenheit 451 ~ Ray Bradbury

Ray Bradbury is just a genius.  I’ve loved everything of his that I’ve ever read. I don’t feel that this one needs a whole lot of explanation.  It’s a scary thought. 

8) 1984 ~ George Orwell

Again, I don’t think this one needs a whole lot of explanation.  ”Those who give up their freedoms in the name of security deserve neither” and all that. 

9) Childhood’s End ~ Arthur C. Clarke

Honestly, it’s just a good sci-fi story, but it has implications of not always trusting those in authority, which is always good allegory to me. 

10) Celtic Magick ~ D.J. Conway

I’m kinda embarrassed to admit this one this publicly, but yeah.  Again, hear me out.  This book is trash. Period. Point. Blank. It presents all kinds of New Age bs as historical fact and misleads people all the time.  That said, had I not read that book as the first ***)O(Pagan)O(*** book I ever read, I don’t know how long it might have taken me to find my path.  As I read more and more, I realized how crap this “info” was. but it kept me searching and searching until I found Gaelic Polytheism and I just felt “home.”  So, for that, I am grateful.  

whoreofabaddon

whoreofabaddon:

pieandhotdogs:

soloontherocks:

like let’s be real

If Jews HAD killed Jesus they sure as hell wouldn’t have crucified him. Crucifixion was a ROMAN thing. If anything we would have, like, thrown rocks at him or some shit. So why the fuck do you people think Jews killed him, not pagans?

Hint: the term you’re looking for is “antisemitism”.

Yeah, pretty sure the preferred method of execution by Jewish authorities
was in fact stoning. See Saint Stephen and the woman Jesus defended from the Pharisees.

At the time, the Romans reserved the right to execute.

Therefore, the Jews couldn’t have killed Jesus even if they had wanted to.

^^^ The Jewish people absolutely were the ones that brought the charges and wasn’t there a point in the story where Pontius Pilate tried not to execute Jesus and offers Barabus, a known criminal, up for execution instead and the Jewish people instead cheer for him to be freed?  Antisemitism is a real thing, but please stop making up reasons to blame things on it. 

whoreofabaddon

whoreofabaddon:

soloontherocks:

whoreofabaddon:

soloontherocks:

whoreofabaddon:

whoreofabaddon:

"Yahweh is so bloody thirsty and violent!" cry the Heathens, unable to process the irony of their statement.

"I like the hypothetical concept of worshipping a war god." The Heathens bemoaned. "The actuality of it is too gruesome for me, so I’m just going to ignore that."

"wargods are hot tho" murmer the Aresians

They just told me that I worshipped a bad god, like I would be shocked to discover that Satan delights in the suffering of man.

hey woa did u know that u worship Satan

WAIT. THAT’S WHO I WORSHIP?!

DAMN IT.

I need a minute.