whoreofabaddon

Anonymous asked:

Hey, I'm the anon who asked Carpe about the chapel veil thing. I have done research, and I found conflicting modern views. I feel a little uncomfortable with my head uncovered at mass, but I don't want to offend anyone so I figured I'd ask someone I see as knowledgeable. I didn't mean for it to come off as me saying 'mantilla' is a bad word, I just wanted to know if wearing a veil is now considered cultural appropriation. My apologies.

whoreofabaddon answered:

You shouldn’t apologize to me, you should apologize to your dignity.

The very phrase ‘I don’t want to offend anyone uncomfortable…’ makes my skin crawl when I see it here.

If anyone is more focused on being ‘uncomfortable’ seeing you wearing a veil than they are on mass, then shame upon them.

Your loyalty belongs to God and Church and not SJWs on tumblr.

When a woman wears a mantilla in mass, it is an act of devotion and a sign of her respect for God.

Would you tell a white nun to remove her habit because white women shouldn’t wear veils? 

Why are you not asking your priest about the meaning behind the use of the mantilla?

Why do you care what tumblr thinks when your actions are sincere and approved (even admired) by the Church?

How is it cultural appropriation? Am I missing something? Lots of different cultures have traditions of women wearing head coverings in Christian services.

But I agree with WoA, if someone is more focused in you than mass, they’re there for the wrong reasons.

dark-vowelled
itmovesmemorelol:

42 Flowers You Can Eat 
by Melissa Breyer   Living / Green Food
The culinary use of flowers dates back thousands of years to the Chinese, Greek and Romans. Many cultures use flowers in their traditional cooking — think of squash blossoms in Italian food and rose petals in Indian food. Adding flowers to your food can be a nice way to add color, flavor and a little whimsy. Some are spicy, and some herbacious, while others are floral and fragrant. The range is surprising.
It’s not uncommon to see flower petals used in salads, teas, and as garnish for desserts, but they inspire creative uses as well — roll spicy ones (like chive blossoms) into handmade pasta dough, incorporate floral ones into homemade ice cream, pickle flower buds (like nasturtium) to make ersatz capers, use them to make a floral simple syrup for use in lemonade or cocktails. I once stuffed gladiolus following a recipe for stuffed squash blossoms — they were great. So many possibilities…
Eating Flowers Safely
So. As lovely as eating flowers can be, it can also be a little … deadly! Not to scare you off or anything. Follow these tips for eating flowers safely:
Eat flowers you know to be consumable — if you are uncertain, consult a reference book on edible flowers and plants.
Eat flowers you have grown yourself, or know to be safe for consumption. Flowers from the florist or nursery have probably been treated with pesticides or other chemicals.
Do not eat roadside flowers or those picked in public parks. Both may have been treated with pesticide or herbicide, and roadside flowers may be polluted by car exhaust.
Eat only the petals, and remove pistils and stamens before eating.
If you suffer from allergies, introduce edible flowers gradually, as they may exacerbate allergies.
To keep flowers fresh, place them on moist paper towels and refrigerate in an airtight container. Some will last up to 10 days this way. Ice water can revitalize limp flowers.
Allium to Violets
1. Allium All blossoms from the allium family (leeks, chives, garlic, garlic chives) are edible and flavorful! Flavors run the gamut from delicate leek to robust garlic. Every part of these plants is edible.
2. AngelicaDepending on the variety, flowers range from pale lavender-blue to deep rose and have a licorice-like flavor.3. Anise hyssopBoth flowers and leaves have a subtle anise or licorice flavor.4. ArugulaBlossoms are small with dark centers and with a peppery flavor much like the leaves. They range in color from white to yellow with dark purple streaks.5. Bachelor’s buttonGrassy in flavor, the petals are edible. Avoid the bitter calyx.6. BasilBlossoms come in a variety of colors, from white to pink to lavender; flavor is similar to the leaves, but milder.7. Bee balmThe red flowers have a minty flavor.8. BorageBlossoms are a lovely blue hue and taste like cucumber!9. Calendula / marigoldA great flower for eating, calendula blossoms are peppery, tangy, and spicy — and their vibrant golden color adds dash to any dish.10. Carnations / dianthusPetals are sweet, once trimmed away from the base. The blossoms taste like their sweet, perfumed aroma.11. ChamomileSmall and daisylike, the flowers have a sweet flavor and are often used in tea. Ragweed sufferers may be allergic to chamomile.12. ChervilDelicate blossoms and flavor, which is anise-tinged.13. ChicoryMildly bitter earthiness of chicory is evident in the petals and buds, which can be pickled.14. ChrysanthemumA little bitter, mums come in a rainbow of colors and a range of flavors range from peppery to pungent. Use only the petals.15. CilantroLike the leaves, people either love the blossoms or hate them. The flowers share the grassy flavor of the herb. Use them fresh as they lose their charm when heated.16. Citrus (orange, lemon, lime, grapefruit, kumquat)Citrus blossoms are sweet and highly scented. Use frugally or they will over-perfume a dish.17. CloverFlowers are sweet with a hint of licorice.18. DandelionRead more about dandelions here: Backyard Forage for Dandelions.19. DillYellow dill flowers taste much like the herb’s leaves.20. English daisyThese aren’t the best-tasting petals — they are somewhat bitter — but they look great!21. FennelYellow fennel flowers are eye candy with a subtle licorice flavor, much like the herb itself.22. FuchsiaTangy fuchsia flowers make a beautiful garnish.23. GladiolusWho knew? Although gladioli are bland, they can be stuffed, or their petals removed for an interesting salad garnish.24. HibiscusFamously used in hibiscus tea, the vibrant cranberry flavor is tart and can be used sparingly.25. HollyhockBland and vegetal in flavor, hollyhock blossoms make a showy, edible garnish.26. ImpatiensFlowers don’t have much flavor — best as a pretty garnish or for candying.27. JasmineThese super-fragrant blooms are used in tea; you can also use them in sweet dishes, but sparingly.28. Johnny Jump-UpAdorable and delicious, the flowers have a subtle mint flavor great for salads, pastas, fruit dishes and drinks.29. LavenderSweet, spicy, and perfumed, the flowers are a great addition to both savory and sweet dishes.30. Lemon berbenaThe diminutive off-white blossoms are redolent of lemon — and great for teas and desserts.31. LilacThe blooms are pungent, but the floral citrusy aroma translates to its flavor as well.32. MintThe flowers are — surprise! — minty. Their intensity varies among varieties.33. NasturtiumOne of the most popular edible flowers, nasturtium blossoms are brilliantly colored with a sweet, floral flavor bursting with a spicy pepper finish. When the flowers go to seed, the seed pod is a marvel of sweet and spicy. You can stuff flowers, add leaves to salads, pickle buds like capers, and garnish to your heart’s content.34. OreganoThe flowers are a pretty, subtle version of the leaf.35. PansyThe petals are somewhat nondescript, but if you eat the whole flower you get more taste.36. RadishVarying in color, radish flowers have a distinctive, peppery bite.37. RoseRemove the white, bitter base and the remaining petals have a strongly perfumed flavor perfect for floating in drinks or scattering across desserts, and for a variety of jams. All roses are edible, with flavor more pronounced in darker varieties.38. RosemaryFlowers taste like a milder version of the herb; nice used as a garnish on dishes that incorporate rosemary.39. SageBlossoms have a subtle flavor similar to the leaves.40. Squash and pumpkinBlossoms from both are wonderful vehicles for stuffing, each having a slight squash flavor. Remove stamens before using.41. SunflowerPetals can be eaten, and the bud can be steamed like an artichoke.42. VioletsAnother famous edible flower, violets are floral, sweet and beautiful as garnishes. Use the flowers in salads and to garnish desserts and drinks.From True Food: Eight Simple Steps to a Healthier You (National Geographic, 2009) by Annie B. Bond, Melissa Breyer and Wendy Gordon.
/|\
☽✪☾ The Dance at Alder Cove - Youth/Father/Geezer  -  I see you
 

//

itmovesmemorelol:

42 Flowers You Can Eat

by Melissa Breyer   Living / Green Food

The culinary use of flowers dates back thousands of years to the Chinese, Greek and Romans. Many cultures use flowers in their traditional cooking — think of squash blossoms in Italian food and rose petals in Indian food. Adding flowers to your food can be a nice way to add color, flavor and a little whimsy. Some are spicy, and some herbacious, while others are floral and fragrant. The range is surprising.

It’s not uncommon to see flower petals used in salads, teas, and as garnish for desserts, but they inspire creative uses as well — roll spicy ones (like chive blossoms) into handmade pasta dough, incorporate floral ones into homemade ice cream, pickle flower buds (like nasturtium) to make ersatz capers, use them to make a floral simple syrup for use in lemonade or cocktails. I once stuffed gladiolus following a recipe for stuffed squash blossoms — they were great. So many possibilities…

Eating Flowers Safely

So. As lovely as eating flowers can be, it can also be a little … deadly! Not to scare you off or anything. Follow these tips for eating flowers safely:

  • Eat flowers you know to be consumable — if you are uncertain, consult a reference book on edible flowers and plants.
  • Eat flowers you have grown yourself, or know to be safe for consumption. Flowers from the florist or nursery have probably been treated with pesticides or other chemicals.
  • Do not eat roadside flowers or those picked in public parks. Both may have been treated with pesticide or herbicide, and roadside flowers may be polluted by car exhaust.
  • Eat only the petals, and remove pistils and stamens before eating.
  • If you suffer from allergies, introduce edible flowers gradually, as they may exacerbate allergies.
  • To keep flowers fresh, place them on moist paper towels and refrigerate in an airtight container. Some will last up to 10 days this way. Ice water can revitalize limp flowers.

Allium to Violets

1. Allium
All blossoms from the allium family (leeks, chives, garlic, garlic chives) are edible and flavorful! Flavors run the gamut from delicate leek to robust garlic. Every part of these plants is edible.

2. Angelica
Depending on the variety, flowers range from pale lavender-blue to deep rose and have a licorice-like flavor.

3. Anise hyssop
Both flowers and leaves have a subtle anise or licorice flavor.

4. Arugula
Blossoms are small with dark centers and with a peppery flavor much like the leaves. They range in color from white to yellow with dark purple streaks.

5. Bachelor’s button
Grassy in flavor, the petals are edible. Avoid the bitter calyx.

6. Basil
Blossoms come in a variety of colors, from white to pink to lavender; flavor is similar to the leaves, but milder.

7. Bee balm
The red flowers have a minty flavor.

8. Borage
Blossoms are a lovely blue hue and taste like cucumber!

9. Calendula / marigold
A great flower for eating, calendula blossoms are peppery, tangy, and spicy — and their vibrant golden color adds dash to any dish.

10. Carnations / dianthus
Petals are sweet, once trimmed away from the base. The blossoms taste like their sweet, perfumed aroma.11. Chamomile
Small and daisylike, the flowers have a sweet flavor and are often used in tea. Ragweed sufferers may be allergic to chamomile.

12. Chervil
Delicate blossoms and flavor, which is anise-tinged.

13. Chicory
Mildly bitter earthiness of chicory is evident in the petals and buds, which can be pickled.

14. Chrysanthemum
A little bitter, mums come in a rainbow of colors and a range of flavors range from peppery to pungent. Use only the petals.

15. Cilantro
Like the leaves, people either love the blossoms or hate them. The flowers share the grassy flavor of the herb. Use them fresh as they lose their charm when heated.

16. Citrus (orange, lemon, lime, grapefruit, kumquat)
Citrus blossoms are sweet and highly scented. Use frugally or they will over-perfume a dish.

17. Clover
Flowers are sweet with a hint of licorice.

18. Dandelion
Read more about dandelions here: Backyard Forage for Dandelions.

19. Dill
Yellow dill flowers taste much like the herb’s leaves.

20. English daisy
These aren’t the best-tasting petals — they are somewhat bitter — but they look great!

21. Fennel
Yellow fennel flowers are eye candy with a subtle licorice flavor, much like the herb itself.

22. Fuchsia
Tangy fuchsia flowers make a beautiful garnish.

23. Gladiolus
Who knew? Although gladioli are bland, they can be stuffed, or their petals removed for an interesting salad garnish.

24. Hibiscus
Famously used in hibiscus tea, the vibrant cranberry flavor is tart and can be used sparingly.

25. Hollyhock
Bland and vegetal in flavor, hollyhock blossoms make a showy, edible garnish.

26. Impatiens
Flowers don’t have much flavor — best as a pretty garnish or for candying.

27. Jasmine
These super-fragrant blooms are used in tea; you can also use them in sweet dishes, but sparingly.

28. Johnny Jump-Up
Adorable and delicious, the flowers have a subtle mint flavor great for salads, pastas, fruit dishes and drinks.

29. Lavender
Sweet, spicy, and perfumed, the flowers are a great addition to both savory and sweet dishes.

30. Lemon berbena
The diminutive off-white blossoms are redolent of lemon — and great for teas and desserts.

31. Lilac
The blooms are pungent, but the floral citrusy aroma translates to its flavor as well.

32. Mint
The flowers are — surprise! — minty. Their intensity varies among varieties.

33. Nasturtium
One of the most popular edible flowers, nasturtium blossoms are brilliantly colored with a sweet, floral flavor bursting with a spicy pepper finish. When the flowers go to seed, the seed pod is a marvel of sweet and spicy. You can stuff flowers, add leaves to salads, pickle buds like capers, and garnish to your heart’s content.

34. Oregano
The flowers are a pretty, subtle version of the leaf.

35. Pansy
The petals are somewhat nondescript, but if you eat the whole flower you get more taste.

36. Radish
Varying in color, radish flowers have a distinctive, peppery bite.

37. Rose
Remove the white, bitter base and the remaining petals have a strongly perfumed flavor perfect for floating in drinks or scattering across desserts, and for a variety of jams. All roses are edible, with flavor more pronounced in darker varieties.

38. Rosemary
Flowers taste like a milder version of the herb; nice used as a garnish on dishes that incorporate rosemary.

39. Sage
Blossoms have a subtle flavor similar to the leaves.

40. Squash and pumpkin
Blossoms from both are wonderful vehicles for stuffing, each having a slight squash flavor. Remove stamens before using.

41. Sunflower
Petals can be eaten, and the bud can be steamed like an artichoke.

42. Violets
Another famous edible flower, violets are floral, sweet and beautiful as garnishes. Use the flowers in salads and to garnish desserts and drinks.

From True Food: Eight Simple Steps to a Healthier You (National Geographic, 2009) by Annie B. Bond, Melissa Breyer and Wendy Gordon.

/|\

☽✪☾
The Dance at Alder Cove -
Youth/Father/Geezer  I see you

 

storiesandconjure

Concerning the Law of Attraction and Cursing

ioqayin:

When one creates a charm or a cursed bag, one is attracting good fortune, or bad fortune unto the object. In magic, like affects like. It is the first law of animistic magic. Whatever is done to the likeness of a thing, shall affect the physical thing. This is based on mysterious connections of the spirit between all of creation. It is the Mystery of One and Separate. 

When making a cursed item, it is best if this item is kept far from the witch, lest they bring misfortune upon themselves. This is why a lot of the old curses instruct to either leave the cursed item at some lonely place, or to bring it directly to the victim’s abode. This is to “anchor” the object, allowing the energies and intentions of the witch to focus and manifest far away from hir, and directly onto the victim. 

If one need keep a cursed poppet close, it is best if the mannequin be kept in a dark box, and wrapped in a black sheet to keep the energies manifested contained. The poppet should then only be brought out to see the light of day when the witch needs to torture the victim in order to exact hir wrath.

Otherwise it is best if the item were kept far away. The benefit of burying a cursed item in the ground is that the forces of nature -literally- eat away at it, benefiting from a slow, rotting curse. Or one may leave it at a crossroads, letting Fate do what it shall. Or perhaps in a graveyard, digging an early grave for the victim in question.

Without these anchors, the energies and spirits summoned up for the curse will return to the witch, and bring with them the misfortune the witch sent out in the first place. The witch must be remorseless, and have no qualms about the curse itself. It is best not to dwell on the curse, but allow the curse to run its course. Dwelling on it will bring those intents to the caster instead. Set it and forget it, that was something I learned long ago.

"It does not do to dwell on dreams [and nightmares] and forget to live."  

spiritualbrainstorms

spiritualbrainstorms:

thewanderingcelt:

Dear Celtic Intensifies, elfofthereach and I have been up all night discussing Proto-Indo-European stuff, Celtic UPGs, and monster stuff. Please try to translate it for us, since we’ll be to tired to remember. kthxbai.

I ♥ you guys xD

dark-vowelled

dark-vowelled:

what if Brigid’s name
is always a coal on my lips scorching
blisters into my skin
until the words transmute
into a sparking wreath of smoke
her holy flame an exaltation
I do not craft but Lady,
how I sing

the healer, smith, artisan
woman who burns, fingertips to lambent eyes
a coruscation like a hymn
what if she blazes
bright as every dream,
leaves me inevitably quiet,
hollowed and hallowed,
yearning — lips parted — after grace

sachairimaccaba

sachairimaccaba:

I made my offerings to the Dé ocus Andé for Lughnasa today since I’ll be on the road tomorrow. I won’t really celebrate the holiday till this weekend when I’m reunited with old friends and family.

On Beltaíne I felt something that suggested my out door shrine needed some color and decoration. So I had an idea; on the four major holidays I will make a new ribbon braid and burn the old on as a sacrifice. I made the first one today.

I used 100% cotton so that they will wear with nature and take to fire. The colors I used for Lughnasa are a dark green, to symbolize the fullness of summer and the crops. Plus it was a color with otherworldy associations. Blue, for the clear skies and rain of late summer in the American Midwest, as well as tears for Tailtíu. And a natural tan/brown for earth and the coming of winter, for dark winds will be coming soon. I want to get a wooden triskele and paint it in bright colors to hang from the braid. I might also start tying loose bits of fabric with prayers and wishes written on them.

I made offerings of flowers and a bit of food form my garden, some nice hazelnuts I’ve been saving, and some water ( as I have no alcohol right now). I then prayed for peace for the people who need it most.

I hope everyone has a safe and wonderful Lughnasa.

Sláinte,

Zach